El Vaq Endorses President Obama for Re-Election

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El Vaquero Staff
October 31, 2012
Filed under Opinion

PRESIDENT OF UNITED STATES

President Barack Obama has proven that he has college students’ best interests by expanding Pell Grants to help low-income students afford college, reforming health care to allow children to remain insured under their parents’ plans until the age of 26, and creating a direct loan program, which protects students from banks and private lenders.

El Vaquero endorses Obama for re-election as president of the United States.

El Vaquero also endorses the following candidates for the respective positions:

U.S. SENATOR

Sen. Dianne Feinstein

U.S. CONGRESS

Rep. Adam Schiff

STATE SENATOR

State Sen. Carol Liu

STATE ASSEMBLY

Assemblyman Mike Gatto

PROPOSITION 30

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: the state would increase personal income taxes for seven years on those who make more than $250,000 per year and increase the sales tax by one-quarter of a cent for four years. The new tax revenues, estimated at an additional $6 billion annually, would fund programs in the state budget, primarily the public school system.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: the state would not increase personal income taxes or the sales tax. There would be increased cuts to the education system would take effect during the 2012-2013 school year.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 30. Without the passage of this measure, Glendale Community College and other colleges in the state would have to cut classes, faculty and classified staff.

PROPOSITION 31

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: that certain fiscal responsibilities of state and local budgeting and oversight procedures would change. Local governments creating plans to coordinate services and would receive funds from the state to develop their own procedures for administering state programs.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: local government would not be given funding to develop their own procedures for administering state programs.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote NO on Proposition 31. This measure threatens public health, environmental programs, endangers future increases on funding for schools and prevents tax cuts.

PROPOSITION 32

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: unions and corporations could not use money automatically deducted from an employee’s paycheck for political purposes. Prohibits unions, corporations and government contractors from contributing to local candidates or their committees. Would cost state and local governments an estimated $1 million annually to implement and enforce the measure’s requirements.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: there would be no change to the existing laws regulating unions, corporations and government contractors’ ability to use automatically deducted paycheck contributions towards local candidates and their committees.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote NO on Proposition 32. This measure exempts thousands of big businesses, while applying restrictions on unions and working people. It won’t take money out of politics.

PROPOSITION 33

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: insurance companies could offer discounts to new customers based on how long they have had auto insurance.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: insurers could continue to provide discounts for their long-term auto insurance customers, but would continue to be prohibited from providing discounts to new customers.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote NO on Proposition 33. A passage of this measure means that new auto insurance customers could be unfairly penalized if they had stopped driving for legitimate reasons or for young drivers who have not been driving for very long.

PROPOSITION 34

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: the current death penalty would be repealed, meaning no offenders could be sentenced to death under state law. The state would provide $100 million to local law enforcement agencies for investigation of rape and homicide cases. The state and law enforcement agencies could save a rough estimate of $130 million annually within the next few years.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: offenders convicted could continue to be sentenced to death. The state would not be required to grant state and local law enforcement agencies additional funding.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 34. With the death penalty repealed, the state would be able to save millions of dollars. Killers would have to work and pay restitution to victims and their families.

PROPOSITION 35

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: longer prison sentences and larger fines for committing human trafficking crimes and requires convicted human traffickers to register as sex offenders.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: existing penalties for human trafficking would remain the same.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 35. Current human trafficking penalties are not strict enough to fit the crime.

PROPOSITION 36

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: criminal offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who commit certain non-serious, non-violent felonies would be sentenced to shorter terms in state prison. This would save an estimated $70 million annually.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: criminal offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who commit any new felony could continue to receive life sentences.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 36. With the passage of this measure the state would save an estimated $70 million dollars annually and would reduce over-crowding of state prisons.

PROPOSITION 37

YES — A yes vote on this proposition means: genetically engineered foods sold in California would have to be specifically labeled as such.

NO — A no vote on this proposition means: genetically engineered foods sold in California would not have to be specifically labeled.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 37. Consumers should be informed if their food has been genetically altered and would not cost the state much to regulate.

PROPOSITION 38

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: state income tax rates for those who make more than $7,316 annually would increase for 12 years. The revenues raised from this measure would fund only K-12 schools and early childhood programs.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: state personal income tax rates would remain at their current levels. No additional funding would be available for K-12 schools and early childhood programs.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote NO on Proposition 38. This measure is a competing measure with Proposition 30. If both propositions pass, the measure with the most votes will go into effect. Proposition 38 specifically leaves out funding for colleges; if this measure passes, state and community colleges will still have to make major cuts to classes, faculty and classified staff.

PROPOSITION 39

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: multistate businesses would not be able to choose their most advantageous method to determine their taxable income. Some multistate businesses would pay more corporate income tax. About half the increased tax revenue would be used to support energy efficient and alternative energy projects.

NO — A no vote on this measure means: most multistate businesses would continue to be able to choose one of two methods to determine their California taxable income.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 39. This measure would increase state revenues by an estimated $1 billion annually. Half of the increased tax revenue would be used to support energy efficient projects, while a significant portion of the other half of the increased tax revenue would help fund education.

PROPOSITION 40

YES — A yes vote on this measure means: the Senate district boundaries certified by the Citizens Redistricting Commission would continue to be used

NO — A no vote on this measure means: the California Supreme Court would appoint special officials to determine new state Senate district boundaries. A no vote would result in a one-time cost of about $1 million to the state and counties.

WE RECOMMEND: Vote YES on Proposition 40. A passage of this measure would save the state the one-time cost of $1 million that would incur if the Supreme Court would have to appoint special officials to determine new boundaries.

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